CARRIE

 
 
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On October 23, 1915, over 25,000 women marched up Fifth Avenue in New York City to advocate for women’s suffrage. At that point, the fight had been ongoing for more than 65 years, with the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 first passing a resolution in favor of women’s suffrage. Unfortunately, they wouldn’t find success for another five years.*

 
 
Photo by Bettmann/Getty Images

Photo by Bettmann/Getty Images

 

New York’s 1915 suffrage parade was the largest held in the city until that time. The parade was led by skilled political strategist, suffragist, and peace activist, Carrie Chapman Catt.

 
 
Photo by Charles Phelps Cushing/Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Charles Phelps Cushing/Alamy Stock Photo

 

Carrie Chapman Catt was an American women's suffrage leader who campaigned for the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave U.S. women the right to vote in 1920. Catt served as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and was the founder of the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women. She led an army of voteless women in 1919 to pressure Congress to pass the constitutional amendment giving them the right to vote and convinced state legislatures to ratify it in 1920 and was one of the best-known women in the United States in the first half of the twentieth century. *